Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for January, 2009

The Game

Credit Crunched from Andrew Otto on Vimeo.

I shot and edited this piece in the fall of ’08 shortly after arriving in
the UK.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Soldiers in the Indiana National Guard's 1st Batallion, 152nd Regiment prepared for deployment to Iraq in 2003 at Indiana's Camp Atterbury.

Soldiers in the Indiana National Guard's 1st Batallion, 152nd Regiment prepared for deployment to Iraq in 2003 at Indiana's Camp Atterbury.

Specialist Jesse Blessinger of the Indiana National Guard's 1st Batallion, 152nd Regiment tries to keep his hands warm on a cold day at Indiana's Camp Atterbury in January of 2003.

Specialist Jesse Blessinger of the Indiana National Guard's 1st Batallion, 152nd Regiment tried to keep his hands warm on a cold day at Indiana's Camp Atterbury in January of 2003.

Soldiers in the Indiana National Guard's 1st Batallion, 152nd Regiment prepared for deployment to Iraq in 2003 at Indiana's Camp Atterbury.

Soldiers in the Indiana National Guard's 1st Batallion, 152nd Regiment prepared for deployment to Iraq in 2003 at Indiana's Camp Atterbury.

Soldiers of the Headquarters Company of the Indiana National Guard 1st Battalion, 152nd Regiment waived to a freinds and relatives as they arrived home in February 2004 after one year of service in Iraq.

Soldiers of the Headquarters Company of the Indiana National Guard 1st Battalion, 152nd Regiment waived to freinds and relatives as they arrived home in 2004 after more than one year of service in Iraq.

Indiana National Guard Sergeant First Class Roy Hughes of the 1st Battalion, 152nd Regiment returned home in 2004 after over a year of service in Iraq.

Indiana National Guard Sergeant First Class Roy Hughes of the 1st Battalion, 152nd Regiment returned home in 2004 after over a year of service in Iraq.

Specialist Jesús Monarez of the Headquarters Company of the 1st Battalion, 152nd Regiment meets his mother at Indianapolis International Airport as members Indiana National Guard returned home after one year of service in Iraq.

Specialist Jesús Monarez of the Headquarters Company of the 1st Battalion, 152nd Regiment greeted his mother at Indianapolis International Airport as members Indiana National Guard returned home after more than one year of service in Iraq.

Read Full Post »

Read Full Post »

Road near Sweetwater Valley, Western Colorado, 2007.

Road near Sweetwater Valley, Western Colorado, 2007.

Photo sharing and blogging offer more context to still images and
I think they’re popular because viewers have a fascination not
only with certain still images, but also the back story.

Shortly after the composition captures them, viewers start digging for
that information just outside the frame’s edges.

Not long ago, Annie Leibovitz’s  photograph of Queen Elizabeth II was
an instance where people seemed to want to know what happened when
the shutter wasn’t firing.

Technical information about particular images is another instance when
viewers look beyond a photograph.

Dave Hobby’s blog Strobist is successful because people want to learn the
techniques behind the images, but, I think the stories behind some of  Florida
nature photographer John Moran’s pictures are interesting even if you have
no desire to photograph anything.

Lawrence Schiller

Last Sunday’s edition of The Times Magazine features a story about
photojournalistLawrence Schiller,  whose current exhibition, American
Icons, is showing at Asprey, London.

Captions accompanying some of Schiller’s images recount his first
meeting with the Jackson Five, his surprise at catching Pat Nixon’s
tears as she reacted to her husband Richard’s failed bid for president
and Paul Newman’s insecurities as an actor.

The Times’ story.

She wrote: “For Schiller these images are a window on an era when
people had a more positive outlook – an era he wants to see return,
and believes that Obama will herald.”

What the images mean to the photographer that shot them is often a
beautiful backstory.

Pictures keep telling

As they get older many of my favorite pictures which I shot become
more personal.

They are not just about the what’s framed.

Yesterday’s post featured a couple pictures I shot in 2007 near
western Colorado’s Sweetwater Valley.

These images are more than landscapes to me. They are about
living one summer 10 miles from running water.

They are about going for a 10 mile run after work. They tell stories
that deal only indirectly with what I photographed.

Read Full Post »

Lightning strike near the Sweetwater Valley, western Colorado summer 2007.

Lightning strike near the Sweetwater Valley, western Colorado, summer 2007.

Rainbow over the Sweetwater Valley, western Colorado, summer 2007.

Rainbow over the Sweetwater Valley, western Colorado, summer 2007.

Read Full Post »

Regent Street, London, January 23, 2009.

Regent Street, London, January 23, 2009.

I don’t know that life is imitating art in this image but it feels like it.

I shot this on London’s Regent Street, a hotbed of fashion and commerce.

Life mimicking the painted, narrated, or, in the case above, the sculpted, is
not conscious. It just feels natural.

When I was 10, I noticed myself holding my arms at my side as I walked down my
school’s hallway arms swaying the way I’d seen Sean Connery playing a confident
James Bond in Thunderball.

Not long after I discovered Miami Vice and wouldn’t think of walking anywhere
without my hands in my pockets. That posture was cool just like Don Johnson’s
Sonny Crockett.

Tell Me

So part of the “art” in art becomes making the sales pitch without the
audience being aware that they’re being sold something.

I don’t think that Ocean’s 13 did such a great job of the sell when Eddie Izzard’s
Roman Nagel told me how to fix green tea, pouring the water right before
it boils.

Also, why does Daniel Craig‘s James Bond feel the need to tell me to include a lemon
peel garnish on his cocktail in Quantum of Solace?

But don’t misread what I’m writing. I have no problem with art trying to
sell things. It’s lucrative or at least a good way to make some extra money.

Just don’t make it an instruction manual.

Read Full Post »

Barack

More people might dread Barack Obama’s presidency if they
stopped to think what change means.

Change is powerful. What it brings can be for the better, but it
produces casualties.

I was a working photojournalist with The Herald in Jasper, Indiana
for four years. When I started in 2002 we were one of the few (if not
the only) newspapers in the United States that still hand processed
black and white film.

While working there, I experienced the paper going from using black and
white film to shooting entirely digital.

During the transition I lamented no longer photographing on black
and white film. I could hold Kodak Tri-X film in my hands, seeing what
the light did to the individual grains of emulsion.

Digital Immediacy

Using Tri-X, I felt closer to the work, but immediacy killed film altogether
in most photojournalism. Now electronic pictures and the web is giving
photojournalists new ways to share.

Photographs can accompany daily blogging, and services like Flickr have a
place in breaking news coverage, Twitter’s visual collaborator.

Considering how I want tell stories now, I can’t imagine shooting film.

Speaking at the Society of Editors 2008 conference in Bristol last November,
video evangelist Michael Rosenblum recounted how English soldiers used
then-new technology, the longbow, in the 14th century against the French.

The change in battle tactics meant England’s soldiers killed thousands
in French King PhilipVI’s army.

Journalism Change

Rosenblum believes that, like what happened in France around 650
years ago, survival in the new journalism is a matter of embracing
new technology.

As a masters student this year at the University of Westminster, I feel like
I’m sinking in a quamire of CSS Rules, HTML and trying to become a writer
for the web.

The change hasn’t killed me yet but it’s a tough route. I felt immersing
myself in the new technology was necessary to my own survival as a journalist.

At the 2008 conference in Bristol, Rosenblum told The Guardian’s
Jemima Kiss that the change newspapers need is for their owners
“burn %90 of it to the ground and do it fast.”

The traditional way of producing a newspaper costs and ad revenue is
shrinking rapidly, so, although brutal, Rosenblum is probably giving
some good advice.

Obama

Considering the economic circumstances right now worldwide, Obama
faces some policy decisions that are just as harsh.

Change is coming but I’m not convinced its going to make many of
us instantly happy.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »