Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘The Guardian’

hijab

Four students at the University of Westminster want the UK’s state
schools to recognize that the hijab
is not hostile.

This message may get tougher to deliver because current research has renewed
debate over the threat that Islamic political views pose at British universities.

The four Westminster students, two of them Muslim, are all studying for masters
degrees in public relations.

They have created a campaign which encourages all primary and secondary state
schools to permit their Muslim female students to wear the hijab or headscarf.

Wearing the hijab “doesn’t pose any threat to [anyone’s] life,” said Karim Hacine,
one of two Muslim students working on the campaign. “It’s not something related to
bombings [or] fundamentalist groups. It’s just a religious symbol for the Muslim females.”

Research and Debate

Dr. June Edmunds
of Cambridge University wrote in The Guardian’s
Comment is Free that interviews she did with Muslim students at British
universities suggest that fears of Islamic extremism on UK campuses is overblown.

Her findings contradicted research which the Centre for Social Cohesion
published in June.

That report said 32% of the 1400 students it polled believed killing in the
name of religion is justifiable.

But, professor Anthony Glees, wrote on The Guardian’s Mortarboard Blog
that Edmunds’ evidence was not reliable because she only conducted 26
student interviews, eight of which were not in person.

Edmunds responded to Glees that her research was solid because she
used more than just the 26 student interviews. She said she also utilized
a focus group, face to face interviews with Muslim youth organizations
and the work of other researchers.

Changing Perceptions

The Westminster students admit that trying to change the UK school
uniform while addressing perceptions of radical Islam in Britain is difficult.

According to the students, many citizens on the street declined answering
basic research questions asking what they knew about the hijab.

Others acted apologetic when they did answer the students said.

“[The hijab] remains sensitive and controversial at the same time,”
Karim Hacine said.

Also, according to Hacine, many people who did answer questions
about the hijab mistook it forthe niqab, the veil which covers the face,
worn by some Muslim women.

British Muslims

The Muslim Council of Britain reports on its website that different
agencies and publications say there are between 1.5 and 1.8 million
Muslims living in the UK.

The council’s site also provides figures that calculate about half of
these Muslims are born in the UK.

“They consider themselves as being Muslim and British,” says
Erab Fuqaha, the other Muslim student working on this campaign.
“It is very important for them to be accepted by their own community.”

Both the Centre for Social Cohesion’s report and Edmunds’ research
seem to show that many Muslim students want the same kind of tolerance
in the UK that Fuqaha does.

” The British, they are so proud of having this multicultural atmosphere,”
Fuqaha said. “If you really claim that you are a multicultural country then
you have to accept all different religions.”

But she thinks that before she can change school attire she will have
to change some perceptions.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

sc4b6007

Education needs to emphasize skills over tools in a new video landscape
which follows what Michael Rosenblum is calling “Gresham’s Law of Media.”

Rosenblum, a video evangelist and early video journalist is advising media
companies all over the world on how to use video. He spent March 23rd and 24th
talking to The Guardian.

Seeing a new media landscape through Sir Thomas Gresham’s idea that “bad
money drives out good” changes the core of journalism.

Gresham believed that consumers who can choose between two currencies will
hoard the one they perceive to be more valuable and trade in the other. Rosenblum
thinks that because online news is immediate and flexible, “perceived as cheaper, hence
more rapidly traded.”

“One is more likely to post an online article than clip and mail the very same article
from the NY Times.” Rosenblum wrote in a Novmeber 25, 2008 blog post.

Trending Downwards

Cheaper technologies dominate.

Experienced digital film makers like Anthony Artis, know how to make the
cheaper technologies work for them. For Artis, video was not just an option
but an opportunity.

As a film student New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, Artis started
shooting in video because it was cheaper and enabled him to learn film making.

In a March 25th webinar with producers of TurnHere Internet Video, Artis
described his mistakes shooting conventional film as “much more expensive than
[he] could afford.”

He felt it made sense to shoot video because unlike film, he could see the results
instantly and if the shoot wasn’t what he wanted he could re-shoot on the spot.

Immediacy Breeds New Tools

Rosenblum believes that in the new media world, where what’s cheap and
immediate thrives, students need to have an up to date knowledge of the
new technologies.

Cliff Etzel thinks the same. Formerly a photojournalist, Etzel is a web
designer and self-described “nuts and bolts videographer.”

“Anyone who doesn’t understand WordPress is gonna get dropped
by the waysdie,” Etzel said.

Blogging, understanding tags and how google works are skills that
journalists need according to Etzel. He is also telling all his website
clients to maintain the blogs he sets up for them and look at how
google picks up their posts.

Etzel also thinks that the cheaper technologies present oppotunities
for video journalists. “There are no more gatekeepers ” Etzel said.
“Television is no longer the only medium to distribute content.”

From Print to Screen

Not long ago Rosenblum spoke to Radio Free Europe and told them
that the 21st century is no longer a world of print but a world of video.

With the opportunity to shoot with small HDV cameras, edit the footage
from a laptop and distribute the finished piece online, Rosenblum argues
that anyone with an idea can produce.

“We are going to undergo a democratization of this incredibly powerful
medium,” he said.

As video becomes more prevalent, understanding the medium’s visual language
is essential, a language independent from text.

In a media world that is no longer just about the printed word or the distribution
of video through broadcast television, there is a lot left to learn.

Read Full Post »

Barack

More people might dread Barack Obama’s presidency if they
stopped to think what change means.

Change is powerful. What it brings can be for the better, but it
produces casualties.

I was a working photojournalist with The Herald in Jasper, Indiana
for four years. When I started in 2002 we were one of the few (if not
the only) newspapers in the United States that still hand processed
black and white film.

While working there, I experienced the paper going from using black and
white film to shooting entirely digital.

During the transition I lamented no longer photographing on black
and white film. I could hold Kodak Tri-X film in my hands, seeing what
the light did to the individual grains of emulsion.

Digital Immediacy

Using Tri-X, I felt closer to the work, but immediacy killed film altogether
in most photojournalism. Now electronic pictures and the web is giving
photojournalists new ways to share.

Photographs can accompany daily blogging, and services like Flickr have a
place in breaking news coverage, Twitter’s visual collaborator.

Considering how I want tell stories now, I can’t imagine shooting film.

Speaking at the Society of Editors 2008 conference in Bristol last November,
video evangelist Michael Rosenblum recounted how English soldiers used
then-new technology, the longbow, in the 14th century against the French.

The change in battle tactics meant England’s soldiers killed thousands
in French King PhilipVI’s army.

Journalism Change

Rosenblum believes that, like what happened in France around 650
years ago, survival in the new journalism is a matter of embracing
new technology.

As a masters student this year at the University of Westminster, I feel like
I’m sinking in a quamire of CSS Rules, HTML and trying to become a writer
for the web.

The change hasn’t killed me yet but it’s a tough route. I felt immersing
myself in the new technology was necessary to my own survival as a journalist.

At the 2008 conference in Bristol, Rosenblum told The Guardian’s
Jemima Kiss that the change newspapers need is for their owners
“burn %90 of it to the ground and do it fast.”

The traditional way of producing a newspaper costs and ad revenue is
shrinking rapidly, so, although brutal, Rosenblum is probably giving
some good advice.

Obama

Considering the economic circumstances right now worldwide, Obama
faces some policy decisions that are just as harsh.

Change is coming but I’m not convinced its going to make many of
us instantly happy.

Read Full Post »

hijab

Erab Fuqaha

_

Four students at the University of Westminster want the UK’s state
schools to recognize that the hijab
is not hostile.

This message may get tougher to deliver because current research has renewed
debate over the threat that Islamic political views pose at British universities.

The four Westminster students, two of them Muslim, are all studying for masters
degrees in public relations.

They have created a campaign which encourages all primary and secondary state
schools to permit their Muslim female students to wear the hijab or headscarf.

Wearing the hijab “doesn’t pose any threat to [anyone’s] life,” said Karim Hacine,
one of two Muslim students working on the campaign. “It’s not something related to
bombings [or] fundamentalist groups. It’s just a religious symbol for the Muslim females.”

Research and Debate

Dr. June Edmunds
of Cambridge University wrote in The Guardian’s Comment is Free
that interviews she did with Muslim students at British universities suggest that fears
of Islamic extremism on UK campuses is overblown.

Her findings contradicted research which the Centre for Social Cohesion published in
June.

That report said 32% of the 1400 students it polled believed killing in the name of religion
is justifiable.

But, professor Anthony Glees, wrote on The Guardian’s Mortarboard Blog that Edmunds’
evidence was not reliable because she only conducted 26 student interviews, eight of which
were not in person.

Edmunds responded to Glees that her research was solid because she used more than
just the 26 student interviews. She said she also utilized a focus group, face to face interviews
with Muslim youth organizations and the work of other researchers.

Changing Perceptions

The Westminster students admit that trying to change the UK school uniform while
addressing perceptions of radical Islam in Britain is difficult.

According to the students, many citizens on the street declined answering basic research
questions asking what they knew about the hijab.

Others acted apologetic when they did answer the students said.

“[The hijab] remains sensitive and controversial at the same time,” Karim Hacine said.

Also, according to Hacine, many people who did answer questions about the hijab
mistook it forthe niqab, the veil which covers the face, worn by some Muslim women.

British Muslims

The Muslim Council of Britain reports on its website that different agencies and
publications say there are between 1.5 and 1.8 million Muslims living in the UK.

The council’s site also provides figures that calculate about half of these Muslims
are born in the UK.

“They consider themselves as being Muslim and British,” says Erab Fuqaha, the
other Muslim student working on this campaign. “It is very important for them to
be accepted by their own community.”

Both the Centre for Social Cohesion’s report and Edmunds’ research seem to show
that many Muslim students want the same kind of tolerance in the UK that Fuqaha does.

” The British, they are so proud of having this multicultural atmosphere,” Fuqaha said.
“If you really claim that you are a multicultural country then you have to accept all different religions.”

But she thinks that before she can change school attire she will have to change
some perceptions.

Read Full Post »